The true spirit of Christmas: How we’ve lost our way and how to find our way back

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perfect xmas 2 The true spirit of Christmas: How we've lost our way and how to find our way back

With the holiday season upon us, it’s easy to get caught up in the chaos of shopping, decorating, and preparing for the perfect Christmas. But have we lost sight of what this holiday is truly about? Or have we never truly understood it to begin with?

Christmas has become a giant consumerist mess, with companies vying for our attention and our wallets in the hopes of boosting their profits. We’re bombarded with ads telling us what to buy and how to celebrate, and it’s easy to get caught up in the rush to keep up with the idealized version of Christmas presented to us. Is the holiday season just about buying stuff and supporting capitalism? Or is there more to it than that?

The truth is, Christmas has a long and complex history, with roots that stretch back to ancient pagan traditions. For many cultures, the winter solstice marked the shortest day of the year and was a time of reflection and renewal. It was a time to go within, to connect with our inner selves and to emerge with a renewed sense of purpose and direction.

But somewhere along the way, we’ve lost touch with this deeper meaning of Christmas. Instead of focusing on inner growth and connection, we’ve become obsessed with creating the perfect holiday experience and with buying the perfect gifts. We’ve become so focused on keeping up with the Joneses and on creating the idealized version of Christmas that we’ve lost sight of what really matters.

And it’s not just about the materialism and consumerism that surrounds the holiday season. It’s also about the pressure to have the perfect family and to create the perfect holiday experience. We’re bombarded with images of happy, smiling families gathered around the tree, and it’s easy to feel like we’re falling short if our holiday season doesn’t look like that. But the truth is, no one’s life is perfect, and it’s okay to embrace the messiness and imperfections of the holiday season.

But it’s not just about the materialism and the pressure to have the perfect family. It’s also about the social guilt that often surrounds the holiday season. With the growing trend of political correctness and inclusivity, it’s become increasingly common to hear people say “happy holidays” instead of “Merry Christmas” in an effort to be more inclusive. But let’s be real, is this really what the holiday season is about? Is it about being afraid to offend someone or about being too afraid to celebrate our own traditions and beliefs?

perfect xmas 1 The true spirit of Christmas: How we've lost our way and how to find our way back

It’s time to reclaim the true spirit of Christmas. It’s time to stop getting caught up in the consumerism and materialism that surrounds the holiday season and to start focusing on what really matters. It’s time to stop feeling guilty for celebrating Christmas and to start embracing the traditions and values that make this holiday so special.

So how do we do that? How do we reclaim the true spirit of Christmas in a world that often seems so disconnected and materialistic? Here are a few ideas:

Take a step back from the consumerism.

Instead of getting caught up in the rush to buy the perfect gift or to create the perfect holiday experience, try to focus on the things that truly matter: love, connection, and meaning.

perfect xmas 3 The true spirit of Christmas: How we've lost our way and how to find our way back

Embrace the imperfections.

The holiday season isn’t about creating the perfect, picture-perfect Christmas. It’s okay to embrace the messiness and imperfections of the holiday season.

Connect with the traditions and values of Christmas.

Whether it’s through religious observances, family traditions, or simply taking the time to reflect on the past year and set intentions for the future, finding ways to connect with the deeper meaning of the holiday can help to bring back the magic of Christmas.

Celebrate diversity.

The holiday season is about more than just celebrating Christmas. It’s important to respect and embrace the diversity of holiday traditions and to be open to learning about and celebrating the holidays of others.

Find your own way.

Everyone has their own way of celebrating the holiday season, and it’s important to find what works for you. Don’t be afraid to break with tradition and create your own holiday experience.

Christmas is so much more than consumerism and materialism. It’s about love, connection, and personal growth. It’s about finding purpose and meaning in a world that can seem disconnected and chaotic.

So let’s reclaim the true spirit of Christmas and rediscover the magic of the holiday season. Don’t be afraid to celebrate your traditions and beliefs, and don’t let the consumerism of the holiday season distract from its true meaning and purpose.

If you’re looking for more inner peace and meaning in life, consider joining Ruda Iande’s Out of the Box Live. You’ll get access to Ruda’s online course, Out of the Box, as well as monthly community calls and a supportive community all focused on personal growth and inner peace. Don’t miss this opportunity to connect with your inner self and find greater meaning in life this holiday season.

Justin Brown

I'm Justin Brown, the founder of Ideapod. I've overseen the evolution of Ideapod from a social network for ideas into a publishing and education platform with millions of monthly readers and multiple products helping people to think critically, see issues clearly and engage with the world responsibly.

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