in ,

Master Buddhist Thich Nhat Hanh reveals the one factor even more important than love for a successful relationship

What’s the secret to a healthy relationship?

If you’re like most people, you probably think it’s love.

Because if you encounter any problems, the love you have for each other will always get you through, right?

But according to Master Buddhist Thich Nhat Hanh, there’s something more important that needs to happen before you can really love your partner.

He says that “understanding” your partner and consciously making time for them is essential if you want to have a successful relationship.


You may be interested in: These are the questions a psychologist says will make you fall in love with anyone


Check out his wise words here:

ADVERTISEMENT

“We really have to understand the person we want to love. If our love is only a will to possess, it is not love. If we only think of ourselves, if we know only our own needs and ignore the needs of the other person, we cannot love. We must look deeply in order to see and understand the needs, aspirations, and suffering of the person we love. This is the ground of real love. You cannot resist loving another person when you really understand him or her.

From time to time, sit close to the one you love, hold his or her hand, and ask, ‘Darling, do I understand you enough? Or am I making you suffer? Please tell me so that I can learn to love you properly. I don’t want to make you suffer, and if I do so because of my ignorance, please tell me so that I can love you better, so that you can be happy.” If you say this in a voice that communicates your real openness to understand, the other person may cry.

That is a good sign, because it means the door of understanding is opening and everything will be possible again.

Maybe a father does not have time or is not brave enough to ask his son such a question. Then the love between them will not be as full as it could be. We need courage to ask these questions, but if we don’t ask, the more we love, the more we may destroy the people we are trying to love. True love needs understanding. With understanding, the one we love will certainly flower.”

Thich Nhat Hanh goes onto say that without understanding, we end up blaming our partner for their weaknesses, which only leads to negative energy. Instead, if we want to change and grow, we need to understand:

“When you plant lettuce, if it does not grow well, you don’t blame the lettuce. You look for reasons it is not doing well. It may need fertilizer, or more water, or less sun. You never blame the lettuce. Yet if we have problems with our friends or family, we blame the other person. But if we know how to take care of them, they will grow well, like the lettuce. Blaming has no positive effect at all, nor does trying to persuade using reason and argument. That is my experience. No blame, no reasoning, no argument, just understanding. If you understand, and you show that you understand, you can love, and the situation will change.”

Do you find value in our articles?

If you do, please consider supporting us by becoming a Prime member. It’s only $4 monthly and helps us to produce more articles like this one. When you join, you also get lifetime access to our online workshop, Developing Your Personal Power (regular price is $160). There’s also a 30-day money-back-guarantee. Learn more about the Prime membership benefits here.

Subscribe to Ideapod's weekly newsletter

Ideas and perspectives for a new generation of authentic individuals.

We won't send you spam. You can easily unsubscribe at any time.

What do you think?

Be the first to comment on this article at Ideapod Discussions

Written by Lachlan Brown

I’m Lachlan Brown, the editor of Ideapod and founder of Hack Spirit. I love writing practical articles that help others live a mindful and better life. I have a graduate degree in Psychology and I’ve spent the last 6 years reading and studying all I can about human psychology and practical ways to hack our mindsets. If you to want to get in touch with me, hit me up on Twitter or Facebook.

What’s really behind jealousy (and what you can do about it)

A psychologist says failed relationships come down to one basic problem