Man, 69, sues to change age to 49: “You can change your gender. Why not your age?”

Emile Ratelband, a 69 year old man from the Netherlands, is suing to legally change his age.

Ratelband’s reason:

He feels like he’s in his 40s.

Ratelband lives in a society where people can legally change their genders, so why can’t he legally change his age?

Why change age?

Ratelband is a motivational speaker and media personality in the Netherlands. He cites several additional reasons for wanting to lower his age from 69 years to 49 years.

He says he would likely have better luck dating, gaining employment, making large purchases such as homes or vehicles.

In an interview with The Washington Post, Ratelband said the following:

“Because nowadays, in Europe and in the United States, we are free people. We can make our own decisions if we want to change our name, or if we want to change our gender. So I want to change my age. My feeling about my body and about my mind is that I’m about 40 or 45.”

Being in his 40s would, make his life much better. It would, for example, improve his dating prospects:

“If you’re 69 on Tinder, you’re outdated,” said Ratelband, who has seven children and is now single.

Ratelband added:

“When I’m on Tinder and it says I’m 69, I don’t get an answer. When I’m 49, with the face I have, I will be in a luxurious position.”

His friends suggested simply modifying his age on dating apps. “But I don’t want to lie,” he said. “If you lie, you have to remember everything you say.”

Source: YouTube screenshot

According to Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf, Ratelband says that he believes that he is a “young god,” and should have the age to fit his physique, which he clearly believes is impressive.

He’s not worried that women who end up seeing him in the flesh will be disappointed.

“Maybe they say, ‘You have weak muscles for 49 years,’” Ratelband muses. “And then I say, ‘But not that one, you know.’”

Being younger will help him be a better life coach

Ratelband also says being younger would help him land more projects at work.

He’s a trainer and life coach, and a former political activist.

Potential clients as him if he can “speak the language of young people” when he tells them his age. Ratelband assures them that he’s well versed in the language of the youth. Yet they’re skeptical.

Incredulous court officials

Clear eyesight. Joints working well. Mental health in tip-top shape. “I get it all checked every two years,” he said.

This is what he told court officials at town hall, where he requested his age be changed.

They initially thought he was crazy.

This wasn’t his first interaction with court officials at the town hall. Many years ago, they refused his request to name his twins Rolls and Royce, after the carmaker. He ended up settling on their legal names France and Minou, but continues to refer to them by Rolls and Royce.

Ratelband won’t be deterred this time. He’s adopted the playbook used by transgender people suing to change their birth certificates. Ratelband agreed to undergo a psychiatric evaluation.

He convinced experts he wasn’t deluded, he said, and that he fully understood the consequences of his actions.

Initially, the judges “laughed like girls.”

Then he delivered an inspirational speech about modern society freeing itself from the false gods of money and government and religion. The judges then became more receptive, Ratelband says.

Making himself distinctly American

Ratelband wants to remake himself in the American image. He was trained by Tony Robbins, the motivational guru followed by millions.

Ratelband lived and traveled with Robbins for six months in the late 1980s, he said. This resulted in Ratelband believing that “you have to make your dreams come true from visualization.”

“This is American thinking,” he said. “Why can’t I change my age if I want to? You have to stretch yourself. If you think you can jump one meter, now I want to jump 20. If you earn 100 grand a month, now I want to earn 120 grand.”

Drawing a comparison with President Trump

Ratelbrand drew a comparison with the tidal wave of support for President Trump. He said that people don’t want to be told how to live or what to believe.

Trump, according to Ratelbrand, had cut himself loose from the standards of the past.

“He is just himself,” he said. “Trump is the first one who is honest. He shows his emotion on Twitter, saying to everyone, ‘Shut up.’ He’s a new kind of person.”


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